Abstract

Authors

MIYAMA Takafumi, OKUMURA Motonori, KOMINAMI Yuji, YOSHIMURA Kenichi, ATAKA Mioko, TANI Akira

Year

2012

Title

Nocturnal isoprene emission from mature trees and diurnal acceleration of isoprene oxidation rates near Quercus serrata Thunb. Leaves

Journal

Journal of Forest Research

Volume


Page


DOI

10.1007/s10310-012-0350-5

Keywords

Chamber method, Global warming, Isoprene flux, PTR-MS, REA method

URL

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10310-012-0350-5

Abstract

Quercus serrata Thunb. ex Murray is a widespread deciduous oak in China, the Korean Peninsula, and Japan, and a strong isoprene emitter. Establishing accurate inventories of this species and estimating net carbon budgets, including biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), necessitates detailed evaluation of BVOC emission and oxidation characteristics. Emissions of isoprene, the most abundant BVOC, presumably contribute to atmospheric chemistry through the formation of photochemical oxidants and secondary organic aerosols. We built an isoprene flux monitoring system to simultaneously reveal characteristics of the flux and fate of isoprene at multiple locations in Q. serrata forests. We used proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and an automated closed chamber to measure isoprene emissions from soil and leaves in a warm-temperate Q. serrata forest. We used a relaxed eddy accumulation system with PTR-MS to simultaneously measure the canopy flux. In continuous foliage chamber measurements, we observed daily variations of isoprene emissions and continuous nocturnal emissions from leaves. Nocturnal emissions exceeded 25 % of total daily leaf emissions and were relatively high at sunset and low at sunrise. These results suggest that nocturnal emissions from mature trees may not be negligible. When leaf emissions were high in the daytime, the canopy isoprene flux tended to plateau at an upper limit. Observations of isoprene concentrations and gradients suggest that the plateau was caused by acceleration of isoprene oxidation, and sequential formation of secondary organic aerosols may occur near the leaf just after emission. Elucidation of these linkages may require continuous field measurements with a simultaneous multi-flux monitoring system.

Site

YMS

Remarks